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Full text of "Annual reports"

226th ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD; 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT, TOWN CLERK'S REPORT, 

REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, AND 

OTHER STATISTICS, 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY i, 1877. 



BOSTON : 

PRESS OF GEORGE H. ELLIS, 

No. 101 Milk Strki.t. 

1877. 



226th ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD; 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT, TOWN CLERK'S REPORT, 

REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, AND 

OTHER STATISTICS, 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY /, 1877. 



BOSTON: 

PRESS OF GEORGE H. ELLIS, 

No. 1 01 Milk Street. 

1877. 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1876. 



Town Clerk. 
CHARLES C. SEWALL. 



Selectmen, Assessors, and Overseers of Poor. 



B. !■. SHUMWAY. 



HAMLET WIGHT, 



A. B. PARKER. 



Treasurer. 
ISAAC FISKE. 



Collector. 
R. A. BATTELLE. 



Auditor. 
CHAS. HAMANT. 



CHAS. HAMANT, 



Constables. 
H. F. BULLARD, 



R. W. SHERMAN. 



J. B. HALE, 



School Co?nmittec. 
J. H. GOULD, 



A. M. CRANE, 



A. E. MASON, 



WM. F. GUILD. 



Surveyors of Highway. 

HAMLET WIGHT, W. P. HEWINS, G. W. KINGSBURY, H. P. TABOR, 

C. H. RUSSELL, F. S. WIGHT. 



J. M. HEWINS, 



Fence Viewers. 
H. F. BULLARD, 



CHAS. HAMANT. 



Measurer of Wood and Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

THOMAS L. BARNEY. 

« 

Weighers. 
THOMAS L. BARNEY, JOHN McDEVITT. 



Board of Health. 
Dr. J. H. RICHARDSON, J. B. HALE, 



J. M. HEWINS. 



GEORGE CUMMINGS, 



Trustees of Public Library. 
Dr. J. H. RICHARDSON, 



ISAAC FISKE. 



Trustee of School Fund. 
CHAS. HAMANT. 



WM. M. WHITING, 



Engineers. 
G. M. HANKS, 



WM. MARSHALL. 



Police. 
BENNETT WILSON, 



WM. CRANE. 



SELECTMEN'S EEPOET. 



The Selectmen of Medfield present the following Report of 
Receipts and Expenditures from February i, 1876, to February 1, 
1877. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance in Treasury, February 1, 1876, $3,848.49 

Taxes for 1874, in full, 8.00 

Interest on Taxes for 1874, 1.14 

Taxes for 1875, IA3S-3* 

Taxes for 1876, 9,422.81 

Rent of Hall, 244.00 

Rent of Stores, 460.22 

Insurance on South School-house, 1,200.00 

National Bank Tax for 1876, 689.97 

Corporation Tax for 1876, 895.82 

State Aid, 192.00 

T. S. Clark, amount of Amy Turner's note, 80.65 

Dog Licenses, 144.28 

Income Massachusetts School Fund, 226.72 

Interest on Town School Fund, 190.40 

Interest on Taxes, 1875, 9°-49 

Hay sold from Town Farm, 75. 12 

Hay sold from Cemetery, . . . .» 4.00 

Butter sold from Town Farm, 43-84 

G. M. Hanks, damage to room in Town House, ... 15-00 

Sale of Books (Dedication of Town House), .... 21.00 

Stove, 6.00 

Old Iron from School-house, 10.00 

Waste Paper from School-house, .75 

City of Springfield for aid to Paupers, i5«oo 

I. Fiske, as Interest on Deposits, 20.00 

G. D. Everett, butter, 168.57 

E. Bullard, pork, io 5-°3 

E. Bullard, calves, 95-9 2 

$19,710.53 



EXPENDITURES. 
CARE OF SCHOOL-HOUSES, FUEL, &c. 

Paid Sam'l Johnson, care of School-house, $46.85 

u.25 

12.50 

3i-5° 

13-75 

27.50 



J. S. Newell, 
Geo. M. Gilmore, " 
Chas. E. Hale, 
A. W. Wight, 
E. T. Adams, 

J. H. Gould & Co., coal, 114.60 

H. Wight, wood, 19.00 

A. E. Mason, wood, 20.50 

W. F. Guild, wood, 20.00 

M. Gilmore, cutting wood, 2.50 

J. A. Newell, coal and wood, 7.50 

$327-45 
TEACHING. 

Paid Miss E. Emerson, 380.00 

Miss S. J. Woods, 400.00 

Mr. Wm. E. Marshall, • . . . 649.42 

Miss Ida C. Whiting, 304.00 

Miss Sarah H. Wight, 250.00 

Miss S. C. Littlefield, 110.00 

Town of Norfolk, for schooling Flora Miller, . . . 4.50 



$2,097.92 



Paid I. Fiske, books, etc., furnished, 71.91 

Total Expenditures for Schools, 1876, 2,497.28 

To Balance due Schools on Settlement, Jan. 31, 1876, . $559.22 

Appropriations, 2,300.00 

Dog Licenses, 144.28 

State Fund, 226.72 

School Fund, 190.40 

$3,420.62 

Expended for schools, 1876, 2,497.28 

Balance due for Schools Feb. 1, 1877, $923.34 



5 
REBUILDING AND REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Paid G. Davis, repairs on North School-house, .... $6.85 

D. Hdisington, repairs on Centre School-house, . 43-32 
G. M. Hanks, shades and fixtures for North 

School-house, 10.56 

J. L. Hammett, furniture, 15.00 

T. S. Clark, rent of room, 24.00 

Rebuilding and furnishing South School-house, . 1,546.07 

Frank Ellis, repairs, 16.40 

Edgar Kingsbury, repairs, 7.74 

Lowell Babcock, painting, 4.20 

C. T. Frost, repairing pumps, 3.70 

Mrs. J. Sullivan, cleaning house, 5.10 

Gardner Chilson, furnace, 170.05 

Chas. Plimpton, labor, 3.75 

Geo. Braman, labor, 5.40 

T. L. Barney, looking-glass, 1.30 

J. Y. Thurston, labor, 4.50 

J. B. Hale, soapstone, 2.00 

Parker's Express, .80 

$1,870.74 

insurance on Centre School-house, 20.50 

North School-house, 37.00 

South School-house, 34. 00 



$91.50 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid Fred M. Smith, for.thirty engine-men, $60.00 

E. T. Everett, care of engine, 17.20 

Jas. Boyd & Sons, 501^ feet hose, 501.65 

Wm. M. Whiting, hats, badges, trumpets, furnished 

engine company, 47 .30 

I. Fiske, supplies, I 4-3^ ) 

Parker's Express, supplies, 10.80 

Cushman & Baker, supplies, 7.07 



S658.3S 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid B. F. Shumway, services as Selectman and Assessor, $120.00 

B. F. Shumway, as Overseer of Poor, . . . . ' . 15.00 
Hamlet Wight, as Selectman and Assessor, . . . 70.00 

Hamlet Wight, as Overseer of Poor, 20.00 

A. B. Parker, as Selectman and Assessor, .... 65.00 

A. B. Parker, as Overseer of Poor, 35-°° 

C. C. Sewall, as Town Clerk, for two years, . . . 50.00 

J. M. R. Eaton, as School Committee, 10.00 

A. M. Crane, as School Committee, 1876-7, . . . 45 .00 

R. A. Battelle, collecting tax in full, 1874, .... 32.89 

R. A. Battelle, collecting tax in full, 1875, .... 94.06 
C. C. Sewall, recording marriages, births, and deaths, 

for two years, 33.75 

$590.70 



EXPENSES OF TOWN HOUSE. 

Paid Sam'l Johnson, care and supplies, $109.92 

Lowell Babcock, labor, 4.75 

D. Hoisington, supplies, 5.70 

Mead & Mason, repairs on chimneys, 1 17.56 

N. F. Harding, repairs, 46.57 

H. Wight, wood, 4.50 

Henry Smith, cleaning vaults, 5.00 

E. T. Everett, cutting wood, 1.00 

J. H. Gould & Co., coal, 35- 2 4 

S. R. Maker, stoves and coal-hod, I 4-75 

T. L. 'Barney, ladder, 1.25 

W. F. Whittemore, painting, 1.30 

Lawrence Wild & Co., bedding for lock-up, . . . 13.25 



$360.79 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Paid S. J. Spear, printing catalogues, $75.00 

Trustees, balance of appropriation, 25.00 



$100.00 



7 
PAUPERS OUT OF ALMSHOUSE. 

Paid Town of Foxboro, aid furnished E. G. Babcock and 

family, $33-oo 

State Lunatic Asylum, board of J. W. Coltman, . . 186.25 

State Lunatic Asylum, board of Susan M. Bullard, . 113.65 

Funeral Expenses of Noah Clark, 1 5.50 

Aid furnished John Hayford, 1452 

Aid furnished Clarence Kingsbury, 5.00 

$367.92 
ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Paid Abatement taxes, 1874, $2.00 

Abatement taxes, 1875, 76.71 

Abatement taxes, 1876, 20.85 

$99.56 
NOTES AND INTEREST. 

Paid Notes, $528.00 

Interest, 1,653.35 

ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid Wm. P. Hewins, surveyor, $221.14 

Hamlet Wight, " 297.84 

G. W. Kingsbury, " . * 250.00 

H. P. Tabor, " 255.33 

F.S.Wight, " 252.00 

Chas. H. Russell, " 229.15 

A. P. Lovell, for gravel, * 6.30 

H. P. Tabor, clearing roads of snow, IO -35 

Hamlet Wight, " " " " 7.50 

F. S. Wight, " " " " 14.45 

Jos. Bailey, " " " " 1.50 

Jos. Bailey, repairing culvert, 1.60 

R. W. Sherman, labor on bridge, 27.00 

Henry Harding, covering-stone for bridge, . . . 8.00 

R. E. Mclntyre, plank for bridge, 14.00 

m, 596.16 



8 

STATE AID. 

Paid Mary A. Kingsbury, $48.00 

Mary Knapp, 48.00 

Eliza Hardy, 60.00 

Mary A. Howard, 88.00 

$244.00 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Paid S. J. Spear, printing reports, etc., $68.25 

B. J. Babcock, returning deaths, 3.50 

G. A. R., decoration, 100.00 

H. M. Parker, express, 7.08 

B. C. & F. R. R., freight, 3.09 

N. Y. & N. E. R. R., freight, 2.45 

Walpole tax, 1876, 4.80 

Medway tax, 1876, 5.27 

State tax, 1876, 1,008.00 

D. B. Fitts, cleaning clock, 15-00 

W. F. Abell, care of clock, 15.00 

Stationary and postage, 5.80 

R. A. Battelle, mowing cemetery, 20.00 

P. S. Chase, services on road committee, .... 3.00 

H. P. Bruce, maintaining watering-place, .... 3.00 

I. Fiske, sundries, 9.89 

A. S. Tabor, repairing town-pumps, 3.00 

$1,277.13 
ALMSHOUSE. 

Amount paid by Treasurer, as follows : — 

Paid Johnson Brothers, groceries, $42.58 

C. D. Cobb & Brothers, groceries, 76.80 

T. L. Barney, merchandise, I 39-5& 

I. Fiske, merchandise, 56.22 

B. J. Babcock, bread, 37-55 

H. M. Parker, bread, 30.90 

T. C. Flinn, bread, 51.62 

Francis Rhodes, fish, 8.41 

E. P. Maguire, fish, 9.70 

Amount carried forward, $453-36 



9 

Amount brought forward, , , . $453.36 

Gould & Co., grain and coal, 39.8 1 

E. A. Wheeler, ice, 11.00 

G. W. Winship, blacksmithing, 5.60 

C. E. Bradley, blacksmithing, 18.76 

Wm. Adams, salary as keeper, in full, 225.00 

Overseers, three pair blankets, 6.00 

Abigail Adams, storage for hay, 6.00 

G. W. Kingsbury; grinding, 3.29 

F. D. Hamant, bull, 20.00 

Dr. Bass, medical attendance, 5.00 

Parker's Express, coffin, 13-30 

R. A. Battelle, funeral expenses of Mary Peters and 

Amy Turner, 8.00 

John Kelley, as keeper, in part, 150.00 

E. Bullard, meat, 149.17 

G. D. Everett, grain, 113.60 

$1,227.89 
REPAIRS, &c. 

Paid W. Q. Fisher, fence-rails, 20.00 

D. Hoisington, range and boiler, 40.00 

D. Hoisington, repairs on stoves, 5.13 

S. R. Maker, two stoves, 20.75 

. H. P. Bruce, mason-work, 18.10 

W. F. Whittemore, painting, 5.85 

R. W. Sherman, rebuilding cellar-wall, 22.50 

B. F. Shumway, rebuilding cellar-wall, 14.50 

C. T. Frost, cleaning well and repairing pumps, . . 9.40 

J. G. Wight, labor, carpentering, 11.25 

Morse & Whyte, wire-netting, 10.00 

Insurance on farm buildings, 3S- 00 

Cushman & Baker, repairs, 9.82 

£222.30 

RECAPITULATION. 

Paid care of and fuel for School-houses, $5 2 7-45 

Teaching Schools, 2,097.92 

Amount carried forward, $2,425.37 

2 



10 



Amount brought fonvani, $2,425.37 

Books, etc., furnished Schools, 1 1 '9* 

Rebuilding and repairs of School-houses, .... 1,870.74 

Insurance on School-houses, 9 I '5° 

Fire Department, 658.38 

Town Officers, 590.70 

Expenses of Town House, 360.79 

Public Library, 100.00 

Paupers out of Almshouse, 367.92 

Abatement of Taxes, 99-56 

Notes, 528.00 

Interest, 1,653.35 

Roads and bridges, 1,596.16 

State aid, 244.00 

Incidental, 1,277.13 

Almshouse Department, 1,227.89 

Repairs, etc., at Town Farm, 222.30 



$13,385-70 

RESOURCES. 

Balance in Treasury Feb. 1, 1877, $6,324.83 

Due from Taxes 1875, 12.13 

Due from Taxes 1876, 1,567.47 

Due for State aid, 288.00 



^6,192. 43 

LIABILITIES. 

Due on Notes to individuals, $14,540.40 

Due John Kelley, balance of salary to Feb. 1, 1877, . 308.33 



$14,848.73 
Liabilities exceed resources, 6,656.30 

Examined and found correct, 

CHARLES HAMANT, Auditor. 
Medfield, Feb. 1, 1877. 



II 

We recommend the sum of nine thousand dollars for the current 
expenses of the ensuing year to be appropriated as follows: — 

For repairs of town-ways, highways, and bridges, . . . $1,400.00 

Pauper expenses, 1,200.00 

General expenses, 2,000.00 

Support of Schools, 2,000.00 

Debt of Town, 1,000.00 

Interest on Debt of Town, 1,400.00 

$9,000.00 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

B. F. SHUMWAY, ) 

HAMLET WIGHT, [■ Selectmen of Medfield. 

A. B. PARKER, ) 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Amount of personal property at Almshouse Feb. i, 1877, 

as per schedule in hands of Overseers, .... $2,271.16 
Amount of personal property at Almshouse Feb. 1, 1876, 2,221.36 

Gain, $49.80 

RECEIPTS BY OVERSEERS. 

Cash in hands of Overseers Feb. 1, 1876, $16.36 

One calf, 1.50 

Board and lodgings, 5.75 

Pork, 52.84 

Potatoes, 5.52 

Milk and butter, 1.80 

Services of bull, 10.50 

Labor off farm, 4.40 

Watermelons, 2.29 

Apples, , 2.40 

Five barrels cranberries, 35-°° 

Turnips and beets, .75 

Chickens, 1.60 

Cash left by Amy Turner, 16.00 

Cash left by Mary Peters, 3.00 

$159.71 

RECEIVED BY TOWN TREASURER. 

Hay, $75- 12 

Butter, 212.41 

City of Springfield, for pauper, ^-oo 

Pork, 105.03 

Calves, '. 95.92 

$503-48 
Total Receipts, $663.19 



13 

PAYMENTS BY OVERSEERS. 

Paid Blacksmiths bills, $19.98 

Fish, 17.83 

School books, .15 

Clothing for Geo. Hunt, 13-40 

Baskets $2.00, cement 48 cents, 2.48 

Tomato plants and seed corn, .90 

Butchering hogs, 3.50 

Kitchen utensils, 1.30 

Repairing wringing-machine, 4.15 

Two boxes strawberries, .40 

Coffin for Amy Turner, 14-25 

Ticket to Boston, .55 

C. D. Cobb & Co., flour and coffee, T o-5o 

Making cider, 1.65 

W. D. Parlin, hardware, 6.03 

O. Woods, lumber, 7.72 

Cranberries, 2.34 

Grinding corn, 2.29 

Services of boar, 4.00 

Clothing for Mr. Allen, 1.20 

H. P. Tabor, for services, 1.50 

Repairing boots and shoes, .90 

Bread, I2 -73 

£129.75 
Paid by Town Treasurer, 1,197.89 

Total Payments, $1,327.64 

Total Receipts, . 663.19 

$664.45 

Expenses exceed receipts, $664.45 

Due J. Kelley to Feb. 1, 1877, 3°8-33 

S972.78 

Entertaining 1175 tramps. $235.00 

Gain in appraisal over last year, 49.80 

$284.80 

$687.98 



Average number of paupers, 5. Cost per week, $2.65. 



PAUPERS IN ALMSHOUSE. 

Silas Allen, aged 82; Arthur Bailey, aged 22; 

Harriet Leland, aged 85; George Hunt, aged 12. 

Pauper expenses out of Almshouse, $367.92. 

B. F. SHUMWAY, 

HAMLET WIGHT, }■ Overseers of Poor. 

A. B. PARKER, 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC LIBEARY- 



TRUSTEES REPORT. 



During the last year one hundred and fifty volumes have been 
added to the Library by purchase, and twenty-nine volumes by 
donation from N. T. Allen, Esq. 

Nine thousand two hundred and eighty-seven volumes have been 
issued by the Librarian, being two thousand two hundred and 
eighty-seven more than the year 1875, and three thousand seven 
hundred and eighty-seven more than 1873. The number of persons 
receiving books, three hundred and ninety-two. 

The books have apparently been better used, and probably better 
read, as the number of those who have taken books simply from 
the novelty or curiosity, as at first seemed, have diminished, and the 
better class of readers, as a rule, take better care of the books. 
Still, with the best care, the constant use makes it necessary, in 
order to preserve the books, that quite a large number of volumes 
should be rebound each year. 

We are convinced that the value of the Library in the estimation 
of the public is increasing yearly ; that it is doing a good work in 
the community ; that it ought to be considered a part of our educa- 
tional system, and, like our common schools, should receive its due 
proportion of support from the appropriations of the town. The 
town has been liberal and prompt in its support heretofore. The 
Library is a part of the valuable property of the town, and it should 
be preserved. At a small expense its value will greatly increase 
from year to year. 

We earnestly recommend an appropriation for the purchase of 
new books, and to meet the current expenses for the coming year. 



16 

The Treasurer submits to the Trustees of the Public Library the 
following report of receipts and expenditures for the year ending 
Jan. 31, 1877 : — 
1876. 

Feb. 1. Received balance in Treasury, $380.05 

July 20. Received of Dr. Richardson, 1.00 

Aug. 9. Received for Bi-Centennial books sold and 

given by Geo. Cummings, Esq., .... 3.00 

Dec. 5. Of Librarian for catalogues, 16.75 

Jan. 31. Balance of appropriation, 25.00 

$425.80 
PAYMENTS. 

From Feb. 12, 1876, to Jan. 27, 1877, paid for 

new books, $247.49 

Jan. 5. Paid Librarian to Jan. 1, 1877, . . . 100.00 

347.49 

Balance in Treasury, $78.31 

Respectfully submitted. 

For the Trustees, 

J. H. RICHARDSON. 



REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



REGISTRY OF MARRIAGES IN 1876. 



Jan. 


13 


Feb. 


7 


Feb. 


24 


April 


20 


May 


23 


June 


1 


June 


19 


June 


27 


July 


3i 


Aug. 


8 


Sept. 


12 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


14 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


29 


Dec. 


18 



George H. Bruce and Sarah H. Fisher. 

E. M. Follet and Jennie E. Grow. 

William B. Marchant and Cynthia C. Cutler. 

William Warner and Anna Mary Flynn. 

William F. Bowers and Fannie M. Richards. 

William F. Weiker and Margaret J. Nichols. 

John H. Rogers and Jennie W. Martin. 

Moses Hartshorn and Hannah Curtis. 

Edward Darrar and Elizabeth (m. n. Moody) Palmer. 

Austin W. Jefferson and E. Emma Grover (married in Foxboro). 

John J. Demerritt and Caroline L. Plympton. 

Thomas G. Welch and Katharine (m. n. Knowles) Johnson. 

Charles F. Stain and Lizzie M. Ballard. 

George B. Harris and Mattie C. Ballard. 

Dwight E. Martin and Georgie Norton. 

John Ross and Agnes Pitt. 

Total Marriages. 16. 



REGISTRY OF BIRTHS IN 1876. 



Mar. 


20 


April 


2 


April 


21 


May 


24 


June 


3 


June 


14 


July 


1 


July 


30 


Aug. 


14 


Aug. 


18 


Aug. 


25 


Sept. 


16 


Sept. 


18 


Sept. 


24 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


17 


Oct. 


20 


Oct. 


23 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


27 



Derward E. Bullard. 
Percy Miller Johnson. 
Warren S. Blake. 
Maggie Celia Miller. 
Eveline Estelle Adams. 
Charles Edward Russell. 
Edgar Alpheus Sherman. 
Jennie Johnston. 
Louise Maria Cole. 
Lulu Whiting. 
Alice Louise Smith. 
Wilfred Reuben Tolman. 
Arthur Wilson Richer. 
Ruth Gertrude Richardson. 
Edward Lambert. 
Henry LeRoy Parker. 
Albert Eaton Gilmorc. 
Mary Alfreda Babcock. 
Celia Cushman Wilson. 
Ada Harding Chase. 

Total Births, jo. 



Ig 



REGISTRY OF DEATHS IN 1876. 



DATE. 



WAMES. 



Jan. 


M 


Jan. 


16 


Jan. 


24 


April 


21 


April 


30 


June 


10 


July 


18 


Aug. 


8 


Aug. 


13 


Aug. 


3 1 


Sept. 


16 


Sept. 


21 


Sept. 


26 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


18 


Oct. 


29 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


18 



Lydia G. Bingham, 
Catherine L. Stain, 
Ellen B. Mason, 
Henry E. Jenness, 
Julia A. Hanley, 
Mary Agnes Hanley, 
Amy Turner, 
Ebenezer Babcock, 
Mary Peters, 
Joel Everett, 
Mary E. Brennan, 
Sarah E. Emery, 

Alice F. Masters, 

Harriet G. Allen, 
Mary P. Hewins, 
Elisha P. Bishop, 
Celia B. Fowle, 
Sally Breck, 



4 yrs., 8 mos., ro days. 
36 yrs. 
62 yrs., 2 mos., 8 days. 

1 yr., 5 mos. 
29 yrs. 

2 mos., 17 days. 

88 yrs. 

83 yrs., 2 mos., 23 days. 
88 yrs. 

84 yrs., n mos., 22 days. 

10 mos., 16 days. 

28 yrs. 

1 yr., 9 mos. 

26 yrs., 7 mos., 29 days. 

81 yrs., 10 mo>. 

22 yrs., 5 mos. 

68 yrs., 8 mos., 15 days. 

77 yrs., 5 mos. 



Diphtheria. 

Heart Disease. 

Consumption. 

Dropsy. 

Consumption. 

Consumption. 

Old Age. 

Old Age. 

Old Age. 

Cystisis. 

Dysentery. 

Consumption. 

Inflammation 
of Brain. 

Consumption. 

Paralysis. 

Consumption. 

Consumption. 

Heart Disease. 



Total Deaths, 18. 



5 over 80 years. 

3 between 50 and 80 years. 

5 between 20 and 50 years. 



5 under 5 years. 
14 Females. 
4 Males. 

CHARLES C. SEWALL, 

Registrar. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OK THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF MEDFIELD, 

FOR THE YEAR, 1876-7. 



The work given us, that of superintending the schools for your 
children, we regard as second to none in importance. With a con- 
sciousness of this, we have striven faithfully to perform the task, — 
with what results you must judge. But before pronouncing your 
judgment, allow us to suggest our views with reference to the duties 
of teachers and parents. The principal work of the teacher in our 
schools consists in educating or developing the different faculties 
of the mind, so that the pupil may be better fitted for the practical 
duties of life. The future of the child will be determined in no 
inconsiderable degree by the success of this work, A well-trained 
mind is like a perfectly-disciplined army ; each faculty and power 
of the mind will yield ready obedience to the dictates of a single 
will, not through constraint but willingly, as if by force of habit. 
With this disciplined mind, one is fitted for, or can readily adapt 
himself to, almost any position in life. 

Moreover, with this acquisition of power, more refined tastes will 
be secured. The mind was made for the truth, and if properly 
developed will love the truth. The prosperous business man 
would think it beneath his dignity to roll marbles in the streets, 
for he finds something better to occupy his attention. So we 
affirm respecting the well trained mind. It will love fact rather than 
fiction. Could our schools do something to stimulate a taste for 
" the true, the beautiful and the good," could they awaken a love 
for the sciences, for history and biography, they would confer a 
benefit not inferior to that of the parent in leaving his accumulated 
property to his child. But to train the mind, and to awaken refined 
tastes is a work requiring no little care. There are dormant facul- 
ties to be aroused to action • those wrongly directed must be turned 
into right channels; while some opposing elements must be sup- 
pressed altogether. To accomplish this, the teacher sometimes 
meets with difficulties ; his patience is tried ; his skill is taxed to 



20 

the uttermost. He should, however, first strive to secure the hearty 
cooperation of the pupil. The more he secures their confidence in 
his ability and sincerity of purpose, the better will he perform his 
task. Yet we must remember that in the school-room the teacher 
is master, and that the pupil gives himself up to be led by the 
teacher. This is the right of the one, the duty of the other. 

It has been the purpose of the committee to make the schools 
efficient in this direction, and we doubt not that the parents have 
the same desire. Both are alike interested in securing the same 
results. We are not opposite factions, but united parties in the same 
work. As such, we claim the cooperation of the parents in the work. 
If it is the duty of the committee to provide for the welfare of the 
schools (a duty they do not covet), we can see no reason why it is 
not the duty of the parents to work with them. If anything ap- 
pears to be wrong, do not magnify it in the presence of the pupil, 
who will thereby lose confidence in the teacher ; but let the com- 
plaint be made to those with whom you trust the schools. They 
will be glad of any information you can give ; they will respect 
your opinion, and, if possible, gratify your wish. But to pursue the 
other course only tends to defeat the object for which both labor. 

At the beginning of the present year the committee voted to 
have but thirty-six weeks' schooling. We were led to this action 
partly to reduce expenses, and partly by reason of the tender age 
of many of the pupils. Yet if sufficient means were given us, we 
would like to add two weeks to the number, making thirty-eight 
weeks. 

On the morning of April 3d, the South School-house was 
destroyed by fire. To provide for the wants of the school 
until a new building should be erected, a room was rented 
in Mr. Thomas Clark's dwelling-house. As the present winter 
approached, it became evident that the furnace long used for heat- 
ing the Centre School-building was unfit for the work. In many 
places it had cracked or burnt through, allowing coal-gas to escape 
into the school-room. Accordingly we voted to replace it with a 
new one. As complaint had always been made that the old one 
did not heat the rooms sufficiently in the coldest weather, we 
thought best to procure the next larger size. We are happy to 
say that it performs the work better than the old one, giving 
entire satisfaction. 

The School-buildings need painting. As this would require con- 
siderable outlay, we leave it with the town to say whether they 
will appropriate money sufficient for the work. 



1 

THE UPPER SCHOOL 
has continued during the past year under the instruction of Mr. 
W. E. Marshall, who has met with gratifying success. Good 
order has been maintained, and commendable progress has been 
made in all the studies. Two or three features are worthy of 
special notice. Considerable attention has been given to the 
study of words. The pupil, both in reading and spelling, is 
required to give an accurate definition of the words used. Such 
has been the interest awakened in spelling that the committee 
were met by one of the pupils at the close of the fall term 
with the request : "Give us a new spelling-book j we have been 
through the old one twice." The advanced classes in grammar 
had reached that point when, in the opinion both of the teacher 
and committee, greater benefit might be derived from the study of 
Latin than by continuing the study of English grammar. Permis- 
sion was given to these to take up Latin with the understanding 
that they should continue the study at least one year. Quite a 
large class have commenced the study, and are pursuing it with 
good success. 

Much might be said in praise of the class in physiology ; also 
of the first two arithmetic classes. If we can be able to continue 
the school with as efficient a teacher as the present one, we see no 
reason why we may not have a school that shall be an honor to the 
town, — the equal of Sherborn or Framingham schools. 

THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
continues under the instruction of Miss Susan J. Woods, whose 
long experience and love for the work render her a valuable 
instructor. Pupils of the age of those in this department are 
to learn fundamental principles ; therefore rapid progress cannot 
be expected if the work is done satisfactorily. Much attention has 
been given to reading, with good results. Considerable interest 
has been awakened in map-drawing, which to us seems the most 
satisfactory method of teaching geography. The order is good 
and the work thoroughly performed. 

THE PRIMARY SCHOOL. 
Miss Esther Emerson has continued as teacher of this school 
for the past year, and has shown her usual care and diligence 
in her work. It requires no little skill to understand the capaci- 
ties of pupils so young as these, and to so impart instruction as 



22 

to best develop the mind. Yet we think the instructor of this 
school well understands her work, and prosecutes it with good 
success. The body makes slow progress in its growth, so does 
the mind ; yet it is important in either case that the growth be 
symmetrical and not deformed. Wrong habits acquired, or wrong 
principles learned are a positive injury. We feel assured that here 
good morals and right principles are inculcated, and the child is 
advanced as fast as its tender age warrants. 

THE NORTH SCHOOL 
commenced the year with Miss Sarah H. Wight as instructor, 
who, by her faithful and diligent labor for many terms, merits 
the respect and confidence of all. The fall term opened with 
Miss Sarah C. Littlefield, a graduate of Charlestown High School, 
as teacher. She came recommended to the committee as one 
possessing both general culture and scholarly attainments. In 
her work she seems to have secured the love of her pupils, and 
to have awakened a good degree of interest in their studies. 
Considerable attention has been given to reading, writing, and 
vocal gymnastics. Good progress has been made. Thorough- 
ness is required, without which no satisfactory work can be 
done. We look upon the school as in good working order, and 
with its present manifest interest, we look for good results in^the 
future. 

THE SOUTH SCHOOL. 

During the past year this school has been taught by Miss Ida C. 
Whiting, whose success last year gave us grounds to expect a good 
school during the present year. Nor have we been disappointed. 
The interest formerly awakened has been continued. No school 
can boast of better order, neither is there any class of students 
who show a more commendable spirit in their work. The school 
has increased somewhat in numbers, so that now it possesses a 
sufficient number (21) to make it interesting to the teacher. Con- 
siderable instruction is given outside of the text-books. 

We made no promise at the commencement of this year that we 
would mention those in our report who had been neither absent 
nor tardy. Yet we cheerfully do this, and would commend them 
as worthy of praise, because they had no such incentive. 

Neither Absent nor Tardy during Three Terms. 
Marcia Merrill, Flora Wiswell, Affie Hanks, Addie Turner, Lottie 
R. Mason. 



23 



Not Absent or Tardy for Two Terms. 
David C. Wolf, Arthur W. Wight, Emma J. Wolf, Jennie Wight, 
Ada Richardson, Nettie Hamant, Minnie Turner, Willie Mar- 
shall, Lottie Richardson, Emma Richards, Frank Quincy, Allie 
Clark, Waldo Kingsbury, Orra Guild, Annie Guild. 

Not Absent or Tardy during One Term. 
Willard A. Newell, Jennie M. Williams, Alice Tufts, Cora 
Bullard, Maud Curtis, Herbert Babcock, Eddie Babcock, John 
Richardson, Mary Griffin, Gracie Parker, Carrie Sullivan, Georgie 
Payson, Mabel Morse, Arthur Guild, Lewis Guild, Maggie 
Callahan. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. B. HALE. 
A. M. CRANE. 
WM. F. GUILD. 
A. E. MASON. 
J. H. GOULD. 

STATISTICS. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Terms. 






^ 
**<? 

^ 

^ S 

H 




Upper. 


Wm. E. Marshall. 


ist Term 14 weeks. 


3 2 


29 





6 






2d " 11 " 


34 


30 





11 






3d " 14* " 


3 2 

• 


29 





6 


Grammar. 


Miss S. J. Woods. 


1 st Term 14 weeks. 


29 


24 












2d " 11 


3 2 


25 












3d " 14* " 


30 


26 








Centre 
Primary. 


Miss E. Emerson. 


ist Term 14 weeks. 
2d " 11 " 


36 


3 1 
33 


1 











3d " 14* " 


33 


25 








North 


Miss S. H. Wight. 


ist Term 14 weeks. 


33 


29 


1 





Mixed. 


Miss S. C. Littlefield. 


2d "II " 


36 


32 


1 


1 






3d " 14* " 


37 


35 


1 


1 


South 
Mixed. 


Miss Ida C. Whiting. 


ist Term 13 weeks. 
2d " 10 " 


19 

20 


16 

1 " 














3d " 15* " ' 


21 


[8 









Yet in 1